What to say if your direct payment is not set up to cover the cost of PPE

To the duty worker for Direct Payments

My [relative/friend/partner] (who has confirmed that I am authorised to write in on [his/her] behalf) has a sizeable personal budget, from the council, based on assessed eligible needs for personal care and other services at home; it is paid as a direct payment and used to employ [one/two/three] PA[s], directly.

I am aware that in order to comply with the Care and Support Guidance, and be sufficient in public law terms, so as to be a lawful payment, the budget ought to cover the legal obligations of an employer. We cannot expect the PA[s] to pay for the PPE on the wages paid; that would not be reasonable on the part of any employer.

We have done the recommended risk assessment; the nature of the care provided has made us sure that we should be supplying (as a matter of legal obligation for the health and safety of both the PA[s] and the direct payment holder) proper PPE. [Name of the person] is not in the clinically vulnerable category but funding for PPE no longer turns on being in that group.

PPE for personal care was not ‘normally required’ before Covid, and my [relative/friend/partner]’s personal budget was not calculated to cover this cost.

We need to spend £x [put the amount in] a week to provide for the recommended reasonable level of care: single use disposable gloves, single use disposable plastic aprons, multi episode fluid-repellent face masks and surgical masks for non-direct contact input.

We think that the council should be increasing the size of the budget to cover the PPE or be supplying it to the employer, from what we can tell from the Guidance and national practice forums.  

Updated guidance for anyone with a direct payment dated 10 July 2020 says this:

“The government consider all PAs to be key workers, meaning they are eligible for provisions such as care for their children at local schools and PPE.

If your PA does not live in the same accommodation as you, there are a number of circumstances in which it is recommended that they wear more PPE than normal. These situations are described below in the section on wearing the right PPE and apply even if you do not have COVID-19 symptoms. If your PA has a clinical need for PPE as outlined in those situations, they are eligible to receive this.

If you or your PA cannot get PPE in this way, your direct payment is not set up to fund PPE, or different/additional PPE needed during the COVID-19 pandemic cannot be funded through your existing direct payment, you should contact your LA or CCG that provides your direct payment. They will help you to get the PPE you need.

This guidance applies whether you have symptoms of COVID-19 or not.

These recommendations apply:

• whether the client you are providing personal care to has symptoms or not, and includes all clients, including those in the ‘extremely vulnerable’ group undergoing shielding and those diagnosed with COVID-19

• whenever you are within 2 metres of someone (client or household member) who is coughing, even if you are not providing direct care to them

• to all personal care, for example: assisting with getting in/out of bed, feeding, dressing, bathing, grooming, toileting, dressings etc. and or when unintended contact with clients is likely (e.g. when caring for clients with challenging behaviour)

• whatever your role in care (i.e. applies to all staff, care workers, cleaners etc.)

The guidance sets out that:

  • when providing personal care which requires a PA to be in direct contact with you (for example, touching) or when within 2 metres of anyone who is coughing, the PA should use disposable gloves, a disposable plastic apron and a fluid-repellent face mask. Eye protection may be needed if there’s a risk of droplets from the individual reaching the PA’s eyes (for example, caring for someone who is repeatedly coughing or who may be vomiting)
  • new disposable gloves and plastic aprons must be used for each individual episode of care (for example, washing, directly helping take medication etc), whether the person has symptoms or not. Surgical and fluid-repellent face masks can be worn continuously for multiple episodes of care, providing the PA does not touch or remove the face mask in between each action. Eye protection can also be used continuously, dependent on a risk assessment. See the conditions in which this should be undertaken
  • when the PA’s care and support does not need them to touch you, but they need to be within 2 metres, gloves and an apron are not needed but a surgical mask is. For example, when your PA is removing medicines from their packaging, or preparing food
  • if you or any members of your household are in the ‘extremely clinically vulnerable’ category and have received a letter to ‘shield’, as a minimum, your PA needs single-use disposable plastic aprons, surgical mask and gloves. A fluid-repellent face mask is needed instead of a surgical mask, if direct contact is required. See more details on who should be shielding

The new guidance says this:

Getting appropriate PPE is very important, and LAs and CCGs have overall responsibility to ensure that you get the PPE you need to stay safe and receive the care and support you need.

Your direct payment might already be set up for you to buy the PPE you need. If this is the case, and you can buy this locally, you should do this first.

If that is not possible, you should speak to your direct payment support organisation, who may be able to help you in getting the PPE you need locally.

If that is not possible, you should speak to your LA or CCG urgently, who will help you to get the PPE you need. You should do this in advance of any of your PPE stock running out so there is time for that PPE to be delivered to you.

If your direct payment is set up so you have the money and responsibility for getting it, but you cannot buy it locally, your LA or CCG will get this for you from a national line.

The government guidance says to contact the commissioner of your direct payment who can provide assistance – and it should be noted: “If you cannot get PPE in this way, or the direct payment is not set up to fund PPE, ask the local authority or CCG that provides the direct payment to help get the required PPE.

Please would you refer the matter to your line manager, and from there to the legal department, before coming back to me about this difficult matter. The benefit to the council of my [relative/friend/partner]’s taking the direct payment and employing a person directly, does mean, we are sure, that the direct payment must cover the full cost of meeting the employer’s obligations.

Etc etc”

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